Classically Educating Disciples for Christ

Seventh and Eighth Grades

Download a pdf version of our Logic School curriculum guide here.

Bible I: Old Testament Introduction and Survey

OTIS is an introductory class in Old Testament (OT) designed to enable students in their study of the OT in order to strengthen their knowledge and understanding of God’s revelation and plan of redemption as they mature in the Christian life. The course will accomplish this by introducing students to foundational concepts of interpretation and theology with respect to the reading and study of the Old Testament. Topics covered include the history of the Hebrew Bible, the divine nature of Scripture, OT interpretation, which takes into account the historical, literary, and theological character of Scripture, Christ in the OT, and a survey of each OT book in succession.

Primary objectives - The students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate that “The whole counsel of God concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man’s salvation, faith and life, is either expressly set down in Scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from Scripture.”
  • List the 66 books of the Bible in order.
  • Treasure God’s Word and hide the Scripture in their hearts (Psalm 119:11) through the discipline of memorizing weekly Bible memorization passages.
  • Demonstrate comprehension of Bible passages from Genesis through Malachi by essay writing and fill in the blank workbook exercises.
  • Read and demonstrate an understanding of extra-Biblical theological texts assigned by the teacher.

Primary teaching methods

  • Group and individual Bible and textbook reading
  • Classroom instruction and discussion
  • Reading of extra-biblical theological material
  • Bible memorization

Primary texts and materials

  • ESV Student Study Bible by Crossway Books
  • The Most Important Thing You’ll Ever Study by Starr Mead, published by Crossway
  • The Invisible Hand by R.C. Sproul
  • The One Year Book of Discovering Jesus in the OT by Nancy Guthrie

Approximate time each week – 3 hours

Bible II: Systematic Theology and Basic Apologetics
 

As defined by Wayne Grudem, systematic theology “is a study that answers the question, ‘What does the whole Bible teach us today?’ about any given topic” So, for example, systematic theology takes the topic of creation and brings together everything the Bible teaches about creation, not just what is taught in one book of the Bible. This class is intended to lay a foundation upon which we hope students will continue to build as they continue to grow in Christ and learn more and more from God’s Word.

Primary objectives - The students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate that “The whole counsel of God concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man’s salvation, faith and life, is either expressly set down in Scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from Scripture.”
  • Explain and know that systematic theology is for the praise of God and for the practice of godliness
  • Provide scripture-based answers to the following list of theological questions:
    ​​

What is the Bible?
What is the Bible?
What is God like?
What is the trinity?
What is creation?
What is prayer?
Who is Satan and what are the angels and demons?
What is man?
What is sin?
Who is Christ?
What is the atonement?
What is the resurrection?
What is election?
What does it mean to become a Christian?
What are justification and adoption?
What are sanctification and perseverance?
What is death?
What is the church?
What will happen when Christ returns?
What is the final judgment?
What is heaven?

  • Defend specifically the Christian faith and the existence of the Trinitarian God against various forms of unbelief.
  • Make a defense with gentleness and respect (1 Pet. 3:15).
  • Explain how God has personally encouraged, changed or challenged them through the study of theology.
  • ​Explain how God has personally encouraged, changed or challenged them through the study of theology.

Primary teaching methods

  • Group and individual Bible and textbook reading
  • Classroom instruction and discussion
  • Reading of extra-biblical theological material
  • Bible memorization

Primary texts and materials

  • ESV Student Study Bible by Crossway Books
  • Christian Beliefs: Twenty Basics Every Christian Should Know by Wayne Grudem
  • The Holiness of God by R.C. Sproul
  • Truth for All Time by John Calvin
  • The Mark of a Christian by Francis Schaeffer

Approximate time each week – 3 hours

History and Geography: World Studies
 

Logic students will study the civilizations of the world through the lens of a Christian worldview, traveling chronologically around the world, studying the ebb and flow of empires, cultures, Christianity, and world religions, and concluding with an examination of the trends of the emerging 21st century. Their studies will begin with Oceana and Australia, and continue with the empires of Eurasia, political turmoil in Europe, the industrial and social revolutions, reform in western culture, colonial Africa, the spread of imperialism, the World Wars, the cold War, and the global community. 

Primary objectives – The students will be able to:

  • Develop geographical literacy regarding our world, its physical attributes, and its manmade boundaries and locales.
  • Analyze primary sources and use them appropriately in studying events of the past.
  • Locate major sites in world history and describe how geographic locale contributes to the development of various cultures.
  • Evaluate the evolution of various cultures across the centuries and around the world.
  • Compare and contrast varying cultures and analyze their interaction with and impact on each other.
  • Explain why humans build cities and trace how cities have changed throughout the course of history.
  • Analyze the development of trade and explain its impact on human culture and economic growth.
  • Compare and evaluate various economic systems.
  • Trace the growth of Christianity and assess its impact on the cultures of the world.
  • Assess the role of other religions in human cultures and evaluate the belief system of each religion studied.
  • Analyze and evaluate how different cultures have viewed the importance of freedom, equality, justice, and citizenship.
  • Discuss what roles Christians may play in a global society.

Primary teaching methods

  • Large group instruction and classroom discussion
  • Textbook comprehension questions
  • Analysis of primary sources
  • Mapwork
  • Individual instruction as needed
  • Written and oral presentations

Primary texts and materials

  • World Studies by Bob Jones University Press
  • World Studies Student Activity Book by BJU Press

Approximate class time per week – 3 ½ hours

Literature
 

Historically, men and women who have understood the times they live in have always concerned themselves with ideas; they have been familiar with the eternal questions, familiar with the usual answers, conversant with the long running debates. The record of this intellectual journey, sometimes referred to as “the great conversation,” is written down in the literature of the western world. The ability to read and understand the literature of our western heritage is a necessary and crucial part of a sound education. Reading requires an active, discriminating mind that is challenged to think, compare, and contrast. The main emphasis of teaching reading is to improve fluency and comprehension by interacting with great literature, developing sound thinking skills, and expanding vocabulary.

Primary objectives – The students will be able to:

  • Read orally and silently:

Demonstrating an ability to read unfamiliar words by using basic decoding skills.
Regularly participating in a schedule of oral and silent reading of literature. (This includes the SFS Boni Libri reading program as well as assigned class reading.)
Demonstrating an ability to comprehend and enjoy books with increasing levels of difficulty and complexity.
Practicing rhetoric by performing oral presentations (drama, oral reading, story-telling, etc.) in front of the class, parent groups, or other students. (An emphasis should be placed on proper diction, phrasing, inflection, etc. that promotes clear eloquent communication.)

  • Demonstrate vocabulary knowledge and comprehension by:

Memorizing definitions of selected vocabulary words and demonstrating an ability to recognize their meanings in more than one context including how they are used as various parts of speech.
Applying contextual clues, derivation of words with Latin roots, and use of the dictionary to determine vocabulary meaning.
Substituting vocabulary words for synonymous words or phrases while maintaining proper connotation within the given context.
Associating vocabulary words with real life/familiar situations and concepts.
Applying vocabulary words to written and oral presentations.

  • Correctly comprehend the literal and inferential meaning of selected literary works by:

Completing written work (essays, worksheet questions, drawing, etc.) that demonstrates comprehension.
Participating in group discussions.
Recognizing and identifying story types by the style of the literature (comedy, drama, fantasy, fiction, legends, myths, mystery, non-fiction, poetry, etc.).
Identify setting, major and minor characters, introduction, conflict, climax, and resolution of a particular work.
Recognizing and identifying literary devices used in selected works of literature.
Recalling the qualities of the characters in stories and acknowledging those that are worth admiring.
Comparing/contrasting selected reading passages with biblical principles found in scripture.

Review objectives – It is understood that primary objectives from prior years will be taught/reviewed as necessary.

Primary teaching methods

Large group instruction

  • Independent reading from required school and classroom literature lists
  • Reading groups where students read orally, listen, and follow along with other students
  • Discussion about the book in large or small groups and answering oral and written questions
  • Using pictures, objects, projects, personal stories, guest speakers, and field trips to increase comprehension and vocabulary, relating as much as possible to the lives of the students
  • Integration with art, Bible, English grammar, history, Latin, etc.

Primary texts and materials

  • Selected titles from the Samuel Fuller School Literature List
  • Selected comprehension guides from approved publishers (Progeny Press, Veritas Press, Memoria Press, Logos, etc.)
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh
  • Captain’s Courageous by Rudyard Kipling
  • The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
  • Horatius at the Bridge by Lord Macaulay
  • The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis
  • Out of the Silent Planet by C.S. Lewis
  • Eagle of the Ninth by Rosemary Sutcliff
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
  • Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
  • Selected Short Stories

Approximate class time per week – 3 hours

English Grammar and Writing
 

Students entering the dialectic phase will continue their work in the Progymnasmata, pre-rhetorical writing exercises used from antiquity down through the centuries. Students will perform exercises in the fable, narrative, chreia, and refutation/confirmation stages of the Progymnasmata.

Primary objectives – The students will be able to:

  • Self-edit sentences and paragraphs.
  • Recognize sentence elements and structure and use a variety of sentence types in formal writing assignments.
  • Properly capitalize and punctuate sentences in all types of writing.
  • Continue to master the first two writing exercises of the Progymnasmata—fable and narrative.  In the context of these two exercises, students will learn the skill of creating stories by using the sub-skills of:

Sequencing
Altering the point of view
Condensing and expanding

  • Develop or exposit a proverb/maxim through a series of prescribed approaches (cause, converse, analogy, example, paraphrase, etc.)
  • Write arguments for or against an idea, thought, or story using the refutation/confirmation Progymnasmata exercises.
  • Collect and record writing ideas in a commonplace book or journal.
  • Use figures of description and figures of speech to increase creativity, beauty, fluency, and clarity of expression in writing.

           
Review objectives – It is understood that primary objectives from prior years will be taught/reviewed as necessary.

Primary teaching methods

  • Large group and individual instruction
  • Imitation of well-written works to teach writing skills
  • Integration of other subjects in written and oral presentations

Primary texts and materials

  • Rod and Staff English 7 “Building Securely” and English 8 “Preparing for Usefulness”
  • Progymnasmata: Fable, Narrative, Proverb, Refutation/Confirmation by Cindy Marsch published by Writing Assessment Services
  • Classical Composition: Fable Stage by James Selby, published by Memoria Press
  • Classical Composition: Narrative Stage by James Selby, published by Memoria Press
  • Classical Composition: Chreia/Maxim by James Selby, published by Memoria Press
  • Classical Composition: Refutation/Confirmation by James Selby, published by Memoria Press

Approximate hours each week – 3 ½ hours

Pre-Algebra – 7th Grade

Primary objectives - The students will be able to:

  • Solve proportions using fractions.
  • Solve geometry problems involving similar shapes using proportions.
  • Multiply and divide using scientific notation.
  • Solve increasingly more difficult problems using positive and negative numbers.
  • Solve equations that include the following:

Fractions and mixed numbers
Negative coefficients
Variables with exponents
Multiple steps
Variables on both sides
Multiple terms
Symbols of inclusion

  • Recognize and write equations using algebraic phrases and sentences.
  • Accurately combine like terms in algebraic expressions.
  • Identify and solve problems using the five properties of algebra (commutative, associative, reflexive, symmetric and transitive).
  • Evaluate exponential expressions and radicals with real numbers and variables.
  • Evaluate roots of negative numbers, negative exponents, and zero exponents.

                       

Primary teaching methods

  • Group instruction and discussion
  • Daily arithmetic and algebra practice

Primary texts and materials

  • Algebra ½: An Incremental Development, 3rd edition published by Saxon Publishers, Inc.

Approximate class time per week – 5 hours

Algebra I – 8th Grade

Primary objectives -- The student will be able to:

  • Represent verbal quantitative situations algebraically and evaluate these expressions for given replacement values of the variables.
  • Perform operations on polynomials including:

Applying the laws of exponents
Adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing polynomials
Factoring completely first and second degree binomials and trinomials in one or two variables

  • Express square roots and cube roots of whole numbers and the square root of a monomial algebraic expression in simplest radical form
  • Solve multistep linear and quadratic equations in two variables
  • Solve multistep linear inequalities algebraically and graphically
  • Graph linear equations and linear inequalities in two variables
  • Analyze linear and quadratic functions both algebraically and graphically
  • Analyze a relation to determine whether a direct or inverse variation exists
  • Represent variations algebraically and graphically

Primary teaching methods

  • Group instruction and discussion
  • Socratic interaction

Primary texts and materials

  • Elementary Algebra by Harold Jacobs
  • Scientific calculator
  • Teacher created materials

Prerequisites – Successful completion (final average of 70% or above) of pre-algebra

Approximate class time per week – 5 hours

Latin
 

In the logic school, students begin a fast paced and in depth study of Latin. Students use what they have previously mastered increasing the depth of their analytical skills in Latin, extending their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary, and preparing them to read and understand more complex Latin texts. The history of Rome, the period of the Roman monarchy and republic, provides the context for Latin translation passages.

Primary objectives – The students will demonstrate knowledge and correct usage of the following elements and grammatical components of Latin:

  • Latin alphabet, pronunciation rules, sentence structure (inflection)
  • Verbs

Principal parts
All conjugations (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th) in the tenses of the Present and Perfect Systems
Transitive and Intransitive verbs; the imperative mood
Irregular verbs:  esse, ire, ferre, posse, volo, nolo
Complementary infinitives

  • Nouns

All declensions (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th)
Cases and their functions (Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Ablative {partial}, Vocative)

  • Pronouns (personal, demonstrative, intensive, reflexive, relative, and interrogative)
  • Adjectives

1st and 2nd Declension adjectives; noun-adjective agreement
3rd Declension adjectives
Special adjectives (UNUS NAUTA)
Reflexive possessive adjectives
Cardinal and ordinal numbers

  • Adverbs
  • Object prepositions
  • Memorize new and review vocabulary words.
  • Identify English words derived from Latin.
  • Memorize and identify a selection of U.S. national and state mottoes in their original Latin.
  • Parse, label, and translate Latin sentences according to Latin grammar and syntax.
  • Demonstrate the ability to read a Latin passage and correctly answer reading comprehension questions.
  • Recognize and identify important characters and events of the Roman monarchy and republic.

Primary teaching methods

  • Large group instruction and dialogue
  • Textbook study and exercises
  • Translation exercises
  • Oral reading in Latin
  • Individual instruction as needed

Primary texts and materials

  • Latin Alive, Book 1, by Karen Moore and Gaylan DuBose, published by Classical Academic Press
  • National Latin Exam by Cheryl Lowe, published by Memoria Press
  • The Ancient Roman World (The World in Ancient Times) by Ronald Mellor and Marni McGee, published by Oxford University Press

Approximate class time per week – 2 hours

General Science
 

The design of this course is to be the student’s first introduction to the sciences. For this reason its content is very wide by design. Some of the major topics examined include the history of science, scientific inquiry, experimental design and analysis, earth sciences and life sciences. All theory introduced is further supported with engaging labs to help deepen understanding of the topics being taught. Completion of this course will prepare a student to be able to more deeply investigate many areas of science.

Primary objectives -- The student will be able to:

  • Begin to understand the nature of God’s creation.
  • Articulate a basic understanding of the history of scientific thought.
  • Accumulate and classify facts to formulate general laws about the natural world.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of inductive thought.
  • Articulate Greek influences upon the development of science.
  • Apply basic mathematical formulas to solve scientific problems.
  • Define and utilize the scientific method understanding its failures and limitations.
  • Distinguish between science, applied science, and technology.
  • Recognize and explain the use of various simple machines (lever, wheel & axle, pulley, inclined plane, wedge, screw)
  • Analyze and interpret experiments and record findings in logbook.

Primary teaching methods

  • Group Instruction
  • Socratic interaction
  • Laboratory experiments

Primary texts and materials

  • Exploring Creation With General Science, Dr. Jay Wile
  • Laboratory notebook
  • Experiment materials

Approximate hours each week – 3 hours

Physical Science
 

Physical science is a study of the key concepts and theories explaining and/or modeling specific aspects of the behavior of creation. This class covers the basic principles of earth science, physics, chemistry and astronomy. Interspersed amongst the reading portion of the modules are many thought-provoking and engaging labs which help to bring new concepts to life and to further spur the curiosity of the young scientist.

Primary objectives -- The student will be able to:

  • Begin to understand the nature of God’s creation.
  • Articulate a basic understanding of the history of scientific thought.
  • Accumulate and classify facts to formulate general laws about the natural world.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of inductive thought.
  • Articulate Greek influences upon the development of science.
  • Apply basic mathematical formulas to solve scientific problems.
  • Define and utilize the scientific method.
  • Analyze and interpret experiments and record findings in logbook.

Primary teaching methods

  • Group Instruction
  • Socratic interaction
  • Laboratory experiments

Primary texts and materials

  • Exploring Creation With Physical Science, Dr. Jay Wile
  • Laboratory notebook
  • Experiment materials

Approximate hours each week – 3 hours

Informal Logic -- Inductive Reasoning

Primary objectives -- The student will be able to:

  • Argue validly and soundly.
  • Understand how worldview impacts arguments and be able to answer three key questions:

What is real?
How do I know what is real?
What should I do about it?

  • Analyze arguments and discover the fallacies that he himself has made or that others have made.
  • Question vague, ambiguous, equivocal terms and expose unstated assumptions.
  • Catch others in fallacious reasoning.
  • Demonstrate understanding of and reasoning skills using informal fallacies.
  • Define and identify common fallacies related to the content of an argument including:

Fallacies of relevance
Fallacies of presupposition
Fallacies of clarity

Primary teaching methods

  • Class lecture
  • Critiquing the arguments of others
  • Debate and group discussion
  • Projects and activities demonstrating logical fallacies

Primary texts and materials

  • The Art of Argument published by Classical Academic Press
  • The Fallacy Detective by Nathaniel Bluedorn & Hans Bluedorn
  • With Good Reason (teacher resource) by S. Morris Engel

Approximate hours each week – 1 ½ hours

Formal Logic -- Deductive Reasoning

Primary objectives -- The student will be able to:

  • Argue validly and soundly
  • Discover how we form ideas, judgments, and arguments, and how we express them, with an emphasis on the structure of reasoning.
  • Take increasingly complex arguments in normal English and turn them into syllogisms and propositions.
  • Judge the validity and soundness of the syllogisms or propositions of an argument once it has been translated from normal English into symbolic form.
  • Demonstrate understanding of and develop reasoning skills using the following:

Syllogism structure (form and mood)
Syllogism rules (validity)
Translation of statements containing parameters and exclusives
Interpretation of the symbolic language of propositional logic

Primary teaching methods

  • Class lecture
  • Critiquing the arguments of others
  • Debate and group discussion

Primary texts and materials

  • Introductory Logic by Doug Wilson and Jim Nance
  • The Discovery of Deduction by Joelle Hodge, Aaron Larsen, and Shelly Johnson
  • With Good Reason (teacher resource) by S. Morris Engel
  • Come, Let Us Reason (teacher resource) by Geisler and Brooks

Approximate hours each week – 1 ½ hours